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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

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• HONDURAS 196
• MEXICO 1966 i CEYLON 1967
• TAIWAN 1966
> PORTUGAL 1966-68
• COSTA RICA 1966
•  UNITED STATES 1966
•ENGLAND AND WALES 1966
> FRANCE 1961
I        I
567 CRUDE DEATH RATE
I         .     .1              I
Figure 2. Relation of crude and standardized (on United States, 1960) death rates per 1,000 population.
Source: Author's calculations.
d(M(t)lF(t)} dt
or by the rule for differentiating a quotient
no = M\
F(t)      M(t) •
We apply this by dividing the first of the differential equations by M(t) and the second by F(t), and equating the right-hand sides to provide an ordinary equation, containing no derivatives, forM(t)/F(f). Its solution ish rates can make a population younger or older, higher birth rates act more simply on age-distribution-they can only make it younger. Because of this fact, the lowest crude death rates in the world today are not shown by the United States and Europe but by Ceylon (7.51 per 1,000 in 1967), Taiwan (5.36 per 1,000 in 1966), and Hong Kong (5.01 per 1,000 in 1966). The United States rate was 9.36 per 1,000 in 1967, and the aggregate of Europe was 10.20 in 1965. Poor countries are tending to have lower crude death rates than rich ones.